7 min read

In Search of a Unicorn

In Search of a Unicorn

I’ve been plagued by nagging injuries most of my adult life—hand and wrist problems, bulging discs in my lower back, and a troublesome knee that surgery only kinda fixed. For several years, I have been limited to carrying only backpacks with frames and waist straps, or to carrying almost negligible weight in a small day pack.

The scope of my activities has also changed, which has impacted my ability to create images. In the United States, there are several iconic spots you can drive right up to. Balanced Rock in Arches National Park is visible from the road. You park your car at Tunnel View in Yosemite. Mesa Arch in Canyonlands National Park, and Horseshoe Bend in AZ require less than a mile of walking. Multnomah Falls in Oregon has a parking lot at the base of the falls. Maroon Bells in Colorado is 100 feet or so from the parking lot. Bixby Bridge in Big Sur has a pull-off at each end. I guess, what I’m saying is that almost all national parks (that I have been to, at least) are built to be accessible. Beyond that, several well-known landscape spots outside of the national parks systems—possibly due to demand—have some facilities to accommodate tourism, including parking lots and short hikes.

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